To learn more about YORK’S COVID-19 response, visit our Coronavirus Updates page.

Skip to Main Content

Upcoming Events

Nothing to list

CANCELLED: 10th Annual OT Research Colloquium

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common pediatric physical and neurological disorder, and describes a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation.
  • What student employee student featured Occupational Therapy Nursing Physician Assistant Social Work
  • When Mar 30, 2020 from 04:45 PM to 07:00 PM (America/New_York / UTC-400)
  • Where SB-133
  • Contact Name
  • Add event to calendar iCal

This event has been canceled due to the current health concerns surrounding COVID-19. We appreciate your understanding and support.

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common pediatric physical and neurological disorder, and describes a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation. The manifestation of CP is  attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain. Although the brain disturbances are non-progressive, the expression of the impairments and resulting disabilities change throughout the life cycle as the child grows, develops, and compensates for the underlying abnormalities. Historically treatment was focused primarily and remediating impairments (e.g., increased muscle tone), with little expectation that motor function could improve. However, we later showed that upper extremity function, albeit impaired, develops at the same rate in children with CP as their typically developed peers. Furthermore, although children with CP demonstrated impaired motor learning, our studies of prehension showed that motor function can indeed improve, but only with much more intensive practice than required of their typically developing peers. Recent systematic analyses of treatment studies demonstrate that rehabilitation approaches that capitalize on these findings, and involve active movement of the participant using “motor learning approaches”, with the focus on increasing function rather than “normalizing movement patterns” are effective in improving movement coordination and function. Here we review the current state-of-the-science behind effective rehabilitation approaches, and the neural predictors (especially the integrity and connectivity pattern of the corticospinal tract) and neural plasticity associated with improved motor outcomes.    

Parking Available for all attending on: 94-20 Guy Brewer Blvd.

No fee for this program. Limited Seating. To pre-register e-mail Mrs. Laudé: epizarrolaude@york.cuny.edu