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Sociology (BA) Program Assessment

Mission

The Sociology Program's aim is to foster students' cultural and social awareness, intellectual and personal growth and respect for diverse communities. The Program is therefore designed to prepare students to read, think, argue and write critically about social issues, relationships and institutions, recognize trends and patterns of social behavior and to analyze factors which shape human societies. Students also develop quantitative literacy skills and the ability to conduct research. These program objectives play a larger role, as they are also part of the York College mission statement. The sociology program objectives are accomplished by offering a broad based curriculum based on theory, concepts, critical thinking and analysis and research methods. Upon successfully completing their B.A. sociology graduates can apply directly to graduate school in disciplines such as the social sciences, social work, education, law and health. Students with a baccalaureate can find employment opportunities in federal, state and local governmental agencies, educational and social services, private sector businesses and international organizations. The most common occupational choices for sociology majors nationally include, social services, counselors, psychologists, administrators, managers, teachers, librarians, marketing researchers, technology consultants and social science researchers.* *American Sociological Association (2010) Launching Majors into Satisfying Careers, pp. 16 and 46.

Goals

  • Achieve Quantitative Literacy
  • Analyze social problems or social phenomena by applying (using) relevant theories, concepts and arguments.
  • Construct logical (written) arguments using academic scholarship
  • Describe sociological theories, concepts and arguments.
  • Interpret scholarly/academic research
# Year Plan Mid-Year Report

The Sociology (BA) Program is part of the school of Arts and Sciences, Behavioral Sciences Department