Engaging Multi-Dialectalism in the Classroom: Towards a Culturally and Linguistically Sustaining Pedagogy

The Provost's Distinguished Lecture Series and the York WAC Program present the 3rd Writing Across the Curriculum Colloquium.
  • What Provost Distinguished Scholars Lectures student featured employee featured plasmas
  • When Apr 14, 2016 from 12:00 PM to 02:00 PM (GMT+0 / UTC0)
  • Where Faculty Dining Room
  • Contact Name
  • Contact Phone 718-262-5331
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A faculty development event aimed at disseminating best practices in writing pedagogy and assessment for courses in the disciplines, and for soliciting faculty feedback about student writing at York.

This year's theme: Engaging Multidialectalism in the Classroom: Towards a Culturally and Linguistically Sustaining Pedagogy

Featured Guest Speaker:

  • Shondel J. Nero, Associate Professor of Teaching and Learning, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Diversity, New York University

A Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Colloquium is a faculty development event aimed at disseminating best practices in writing pedagogy and assessment for courses in the disciplines, and for soliciting faculty feedback about student writing at York. This will be the third annual WAC Colloquium at York. Previous themes have included WAC Assessment (2014) and “A Culture of Writing” (2015).

This year’s theme:

Engaging Multidialectalism in the Classroom: Towards a Culturally and Linguistically Sustaining Pedagogy

To promote thoughtful engagement with linguistic diversity and to encourage concrete changes in pedagogical approaches the two-hour program for this year’s WAC Colloquium will be in two parts:

  1. York faculty (Jonathan Hall and Heather Robinson, English) will present data from a study of York students: how do they use multiple Englishes in their everyday lives? How does this affect their academic work? Both survey and interview data will be used to paint a picture of our students, and to enable a conversation with the other faculty in attendance, who will be invited to add their own experiences and observations.
  2. Our Featured Guest Speaker: Shondel J. Nero, Associate Professor of Teaching and Learning, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Diversity, New York University

Prof. Nero will conduct a participatory workshop on specific pedagogical techniques for engaging diversity in the classroom.

All faculty at the college are encouraged to attend. Light refreshments will be served.

About Our Guest Speaker:

Dr. Shondel Nero is Associate Professor and Director of the Program in Multilingual Multicultural Studies in the Department of Teaching and Learning. She is an applied linguist whose work focuses on the education of second-language and second-dialect speakers. Her research examines the politics, challenges, and strategies of educating students who speak and/or write in nonstandard varieties of English, World Englishes, and Creoles. She has researched the linguistic and educational needs of speakers of Caribbean Creole English in New York City public schools and colleges.

Her work has appeared in prominent peer-reviewed journals such as TESOL Quarterly, Language and Education, World Englishes, Applied Linguistics Review, English Today, and Language, Culture, and Curriculum. A native of Guyana, Dr. Nero is the author of Englishes in Contact: Anglophone Caribbean Students in an Urban College (Hampton Press, 2001), editor of Dialects, Englishes, Creoles, and Education (Routledge, 2006), and co-author with Dohra Ahmad of Vernaculars in the Classroom: Paradoxes, Pedagogy, Possibilities (Routledge, 2014). She was a recent Fulbright scholar at the University of the West Indies, Jamaica, where she researched the implementation of the Jamaican Language Education Policy with respect to Creole speakers. Dr. Nero also directs a study-abroad program in the Dominican Republic as a means of developing teachers' linguistic and intercultural competence.

She earned her doctorate in applied linguistics from Columbia University's Teachers College, and taught in the English Department at Long Island University, Brooklyn, and in the School of Education at St. John's University prior to joining the New York University faculty.