Financial Aid

The Financial Aid Office at York College provides instruction on the processes for applying, securing and maintaining eligibility for financial resources to meet educational costs, and ensures that every student is treated with the highest degree of professionalism, confidentiality, honesty and integrity. The Financial Aid Office is located in the Academic Core Building, room 1M08.

The Cost of Education

The cost of education is an important consideration when deciding which educational program is best suited to your goals and aspirations. The following information should be of assistance to you in calculating the costs related to attending York College. By performing some basic calculations, you can develop your own student budget. Generally, a student budget consists of the direct educational costs of tuition, fees, books and supplies, as well as those costs which are incurred by virtue of attendance, such as transportation and lunch. Students who are not living with their parents also need to take into consideration housing costs, and those with young children need to include childcare expenses.

Developing a Budget

The following are the most recent CUNY guidelines used for establishing the total cost of education for financial aid purposes. The amounts vary according to whether a student is living with parents or living away from home. Students should be aware that these are minimal figures, and that actual costs, especially for housing, may be higher. These figures are based on an academic year of nine months.

2014 - 2015 Nine Month Budget

Students Living at Home Students Living Away from Home
Tuition and Fees $6,448 Tuition and Fees $6,448
Books and Supplies $1,304 Books and Supplies $1,304
Transportation $1,020 Transportation $1,020
Lunch $1,148 Lunch $1,148
Personal Expenses $1,798 Personal Expenses $4,106
Room and Board at home $1,918 Housing $10,386
- Food at Home $2,020
Total Variable Costs $13,636 Total Variable Costs $26,432

Budget Adjustments

Child Care: Students who have dependent children under 13 years of age will be eligible for a budget allowance of up to $3,159 regardless of the number of children under 13 (12 years, 12 months minus a day). Disabled/Handicapped: Students who can document additional expenses as a result of a disability and are not sponsored by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation (OVR) and the Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped, can receive a budget adjustment.

Financial Aid

Financial Aid provides assistance to students in securing resources to pay for the costs of college. Eligibility for most assistance is based upon demonstrated financial need. Financial need considers the average cost of attending college and an expected family contribution using a formula established by the U.S. Congress. Your expected family contribution is determined by filing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). When you apply for financial aid using the FAFSA, you are actually applying to several different aid programs. Financial Aid assists students in the application process and matches fund sources to students based on eligibility requirements. Updated information is maintained on the Financial Aid website.

Applying for Financial Aid

To apply, students are required to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. When you file the FAFSA on the Web, you will be directed to a TAP application used to apply for state aid. To expedite the application, you and your parents should request a PIN from the federal government. This is done at www.pin.ed.gov. The PIN acts as an electronic signature and can speed not only the FAFSA and TAP applications, but also other documents throughout the year. The York College federal code is 004759 and the state code is 1418.

Transfer Students

Students transferring to York should ensure that York College is listed on their application for federal and state aid. You can add the York College Federal Code (004759) at www.fafsa.gov. The York College TAP school code is 1418. Students' state applications may be checked and updated at www.hesc.ny.gov.

New York State Programs

Tuition Assistance Program (TAP)

The New York State Tuition Assistance Program helps eligible New York residents attending in-state postsecondary institutions pay for tuition. Depending on the academic year in which the student began study, annual TAP awards range from $500 to $5,000.

To be eligible for TAP, a student must:

  • Be a United States citizen or eligible non-citizen.
  • Be a legal resident of New York State.
  • Study full-time (at least 12 credits per semester applicable toward your degree program).
  • Have graduated from a U.S. high school, or have a GED, or have passed a federally-approved "Ability to Benefit" test as defined by the Commissioner of the State Education Department.
  • Be matriculated in an approved program of study and be in good academic standing.
  • Have declared a major no later than 30 days from end of add/drop period in the first term of your junior year.
  • Meet good academic standing requirement.
  • Not be in default on any State or Federal made student loan.
  • Meet income eligibility limitations.

Effective fall 1998, disabled students who meet the definition in the 1990 Federal Americans with Disabilities Act may receive TAP while attending less than full-time. Please check with Financial Aid, room 1M08, for updated information.

What Are The Income Limits?

  • Dependent undergraduate students or independent students who are married and have tax dependents - $80,000 NYS net taxable income.
  • Independent undergraduate students who are married and have no other tax dependents - $40,000 NYS net taxable income.
  • Single independent undergraduate students with no taxable dependents - $10,000 NYS net taxable income.

What Determines The Amount Of The Award?

  • Academic year in which first payment of TAP or any state award is received.
  • Combined family NYS net taxable income.
  • Financial status (dependent or independent).
  • Other family members enrolled in college.
  • The final filing deadline for TAP is June 30 of the academic year for which aid is sought.

Part-Time TAP (PTAP)

New York State Education Law was amended in 2006 to create a Part-Time Tuition Assistance Program for New York State students. To be eligible for part-Time TAP, students must have been freshmen in the 2006-2007 academic year or thereafter, have earned 12 credits or more in each of two consecutive semesters, prior to dropping to part-time (6-11 credits) and maintain a "C" average. Part-Time TAP allows for partial TAP payment for students taking 6-11 credits.

To be eligible for PTAP, a student must:

  • Be a United States citizen or eligible non-citizen.
  • Be a legal resident of New York State.
  • Have graduated from high school in the United States, or earned a GED, or passed a federally approved "Ability to Benefit" test as defined by the Commissioner of the State Education Department.
  • Be matriculated in an approved program of study and be in good academic standing.
  • Have declared a major no later than 30 days from end of add/drop period in the first term of your junior year.
  • Meet good academic standing requirements.
  • Be taking 6 but fewer than 12 credits per semester.
  • Not be in default on any State or Federal student loan.
  • Meet income eligibility limitations.

Award Amounts

A PTAP award is calculated as a proportional fraction of a normal full-time TAP award based on the number of part-time credits a student is registered for.

Income Limits

Refer to the income limits for TAP.

Aid for Part-Time Study (APTS)

To be considered for an APTS award, students must meet the same eligibility requirements as the TAP program with one difference. It is a part-time program therefore you must be registered for at least 6 credits but less than 12, of which 3 must be non-remedial credits. You must have completed the FAFSA, TAP application and the CUNY Financial Aid Supplement to be considered for APTS.

Income Limits

Eligibility for an APTS award is based on New York State net taxable income and federal, state, and local pension income from the preceding calendar year. If students were eligible to be claimed as tax dependents by their parents, the family's New York State net taxable income may not exceed $50,550 including both the student and parent's income. If students were not eligible to be claimed by their parents as tax dependents, their New York State net taxable income, including spouse's income, can be as much as $34,250 to qualify for an award. Spouse's income must be included if they were married on or before December 31 of the previous calendar year. If students were not eligible to be claimed by their parents, but were eligible to claim tax dependents other than self and/or spouse, the New York State net taxable income, including spouse's income, may not exceed $50,550 to qualify for an award. Spouse's income must be included if they were married on or before December 31 of the previous calendar year.

Search for Education, Elevation and Knowledge (SEEK)

SEEK is a New York State program available at CUNY's four-year and comprehensive colleges and designed to assist students who are both academically and financially disadvantaged. To receive funds from SEEK you must complete both the FAFSA and TAP applications and you must register as a full-time student.

Admission into the SEEK program is part of the CUNY admissions process; there is no separate application. Admission is based on both your financial situation and your academic background. If you are a new CUNY student and have been admitted into the SEEK program, your SEEK funding will not appear on your financial aid award letter until you have submitted all the financial documents required to prove economic eligibility for these programs.

Other New York State Scholarships and Awards

New York State offers a number of special scholarships for students who excelled in high school or who may be pursuing particular academic objectives. Information about these scholarships is available from the New York State Higher Education Services Corporation website.

State Satisfactory Academic Progress Guidelines

The regulations stipulate that in order to maintain TAP eligibility, students must meet the academic progress standard each award semester. This standard has two components:

  • Students must accrue a specified number of credits per semester (see tables below).
  • Students must achieve a minimum level of performance as measured by cumulative grade point average (GPA) per semester (see tables below).
Table 1 - Applies to non-remedial students first receiving aid in 2010-11 and thereafter.
Before Being Certified For This Payment
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
Pursuit: A student must have completed this percentage of 12 equated credits if full-time, or this percentage of entire course load if part-time
0 50% 50% 75% 75% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
TAP payment points to be accrued
6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60
Academic Progress: A student must have accrued at least this many credits
0 6 15 27 39 51 66 81 96 111
With at least this grade point average
0 1.5 1.8 1.8 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0
Table 2 - Applies to students first receiving aid 2007-08 through and including 2009-10, and remedial students 1st receiving aid in 2007-08 and thereafter.
Before Being Certified For This Payment
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
Pursuit: A student must have completed this percentage of 12 equated credits if full-time, or this percentage of entire course load if part-time
0 50% 50% 75% 75% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%
TAP payment to be accrued
6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 60
Academic Progress: A student must have accrued at least this many credits
0 3 9 21 33 45 60 75 90 105
With at least this grade point average
0 1.1 1.2 1.3 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

Note: Transfer students who have received two or more years of TAP are eligible for TAP in their initial term at York but must meet the "C" average requirement thereafter.

Maximum Eligibility

Undergraduate students enrolled in four year programs may receive up to four years of TAP assistance for fulltime study; up to five years in the SEEK Program. At the time of this publication, the New York State budget did not provide TAP funding for graduate students. HESC monitors the usage of NYS awards by assigning payment points for each award a student receives: 6 points for a full-time semester payment; 3 points for a half-time accelerated study summer payment; and 3 points for an APTS payment. PTAP usage is measured as a proportional fraction of a full-time semester TAP payment.

Petitioning for a Waiver

A one-time waiver of the normal progress requirements may be granted. If you fail to meet the TAP pursuit, progress, and/or attendance requirements, you may apply to the TAP Waiver Committee for a waiver. Extenuating circumstances, which will be considered by the committee, and which must be documented are as follows:

  • Personal illness involving hospitalization or extended home confinement.
  • Illness in immediate family requiring your absence from classes for an extended period.
  • Emotionally disabling condition, which prevented you from attending classes.
  • Change in working conditions of your job on which you and your family are dependent.
  • Military duty, incarceration or other involvement with agencies or government, which prevented you from attending classes.

For undue hardship directly affecting the 2.0 requirement, more than one waiver may be granted. Your academic record will be assessed for indications that you will be able to meet the standards in the following semester. A waiver does not extend the number of TAP payments you may receive. It does enable you to receive TAP for that semester only and you must then meet the requirements to be eligible for further payments. Students who fail to meet the State's academic standards will be notified and informed of their right to petition to waive Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) requirements.

Federal Student Aid Programs

To determine if you are eligible, the U.S. Department of Education uses a standard formula established by Congress to evaluate the information you report when you apply. Based upon the information that you provide on the FAFSA, your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) number will be used to determine your eligibility for federal student aid. If you claim to be an independent student, you may be asked to submit proof before receiving federal student aid.

You are an independent student if you are one of the following:

  • At least 24 years old by January 1 of the award year.
  • A married student.
  • A veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States.
  • A student with legal dependents other than a spouse.
  • An orphan and in foster care or ward of the court as of age 13 or older.
  • A graduate or professional student.
  • Currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training.
  • An emancipated minor as determined by your state of legal residence.
  • In legal guardianship as determined by your state of legal residence.
  • After July 1, 2013, you were determined to be an unaccompanied youth who is homeless, or were self-supporting and at risk of being homeless.

A student may also be considered independent if the financial aid administrator determines and documents the student's independent student status based on unusual circumstances. The Financial Administrator's decision is final and cannot be appealed to the U.S. Department of Education. Awards are paid with the expectation that the student will remain enrolled for the entire semester. A student who withdraws, officially or unofficially, or stops attending may be required to repay a portion or all of the award. A student who withdraws before payment is made may be eligible for a prorated award. For information, students should contact Financial Aid.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Federal regulations require the college to establish standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for purposes of the receipt of Title IV financial assistance. When appropriate, this policy may be applied to other aid programs administered by Financial Aid. A student must maintain satisfactory academic progress in a course of study regardless of whether the student was a previous recipient of Title IV financial assistance. The factors required to measure satisfactory progress are qualitative and quantitative. The qualitative measure is the grade point average. The quantitative measure is the time-frame/limitation.

Undergraduate Students

In order to be making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree, for purposes of receipt of Title IV Federal Student Assistance, an undergraduate student must, after two years of enrollment at the college, achieve a 2.0 GPA ("C") average and accumulate credits toward the degree according to the following standards:

  • Achieved at least the GPA required for probationary status at York and
  • Accumulated credits equal to, or greater than, a certain percentage of the total credits attempted according to the following:
    Attempted Credits153045607590105120135150165180
    Earned Credits051627425063728495108117
  • Attempted no more than 150% of the credits normally required for completion of the degree.

Graduate Students

In order to be making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree, for purposes of receipt of Title IV Federal Assistance, a graduate student must:

  • Maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 or better, or have an academic standing consistent with the requirements for graduation.
  • Attempted no more than 150% of the credits normally required for completion of the degree.
  • Accumulated credits equal to or greater than two-thirds the cumulative credits attempted.

Students will be measured against the satisfactory academic standard, at the end of the spring term, to determine eligibility for receipt of Title IV student financial assistance for the upcoming year. Students who fall beneath the conditional standard may petition to the Petition Committee to retain their eligibility for receipt of Title IV Federal Student Assistance. These appeals will be evaluated for mitigating circumstances resulting from events, such as personal illness, injury, and personal tragedy, and for indicators that the student will achieve the appropriate standard. A successful appeal will result in a one-semester probationary period during which the student must meet the appropriate standard. A student who chooses to be enrolled without receipt of Title IV Federal Student Assistance may request a review of his/her academic record after the summer, fall or spring terms for a determination of whether or not the coursework taken in those periods have brought them up to the appropriate standard. If the standard is met with the inclusion of the coursework, eligibility for receipt of Title IV Federal Student Assistance may be restored for subsequent terms in that year.

Withdrawals

Withdrawals recorded on your permanent record will be counted in your cumulative record of credits attempted and will adversely affect your ability to meet the satisfactory progress standard.

Note: Changes to your enrollment record caused by retroactive "non-punitive" administrative withdrawal activity can result in your having to repay the assistance you received that term.

Incomplete Grades

Your cumulative record of attempted credits must include any course for which you receive an incomplete grade. This course cannot be counted in your record of accumulated credits until you have received a completion grade. If you fail to meet the satisfactory progress standard for credit accumulation due to an incomplete grade for a course, the recording of a successful completion grade, within a term which brings your accumulated credits up to the satisfactory progress standard, will restore eligibility for this and subsequent terms within the academic year.

Repeated Courses

Successfully completed courses can generally be accepted toward degree requirements only once. However, each time you attempt a course, it is included as part of your cumulative record of attempted credits. Therefore, repeating a course, regardless of prior grade, reduces your ability to meet the satisfactory progress standard. Note: Federal aid permits repeat of a previously passed course only once.

Federal Pell Grant

A Federal Pell Grant is an award to assist undergraduates to pay for education after high school. You must be enrolled for at least one credit as an undergraduate matriculated student in an approved postsecondary institution and you must need financial assistance to continue your education. Students will be limited to a maximum of 12 terms of full-time Pell payment or its equivalent for part-time study.

Award Schedule

In the 2014-2015 academic year, the maximum Pell Grant is $5,730. The amount of the award will depend upon your Expected Family Contribution, the cost of attendance, enrollment status, and whether you attend school for a full academic year, or less.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

FSEOG is a program which helps exceptionally needy students with educationally related expenses. FSEOG awards are made to supplement other forms of financial aid and do not have to be repaid. Awards depend on the level of student need, and availability of funds.

Selection of recipients and allocation of awards to be eligible, you must be:

  • A U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen enrolled as an undergraduate student in approved post-secondary institution, which is eligible to participate in the FSEOG program.
  • Enrolled for at least six credit hours in an institution which will provide the applicant with additional financial assistance at least equal to the amount of the FSEOG award. All awards are based on the availability of federal funds.

Federal Work Study Program (FWS)

Federal Work-Study is a program which provides employment for students with financial need. The program encourages community service and work related to the student's course of study. Jobs are available both on and off campus. The FWS award amount depends on the level of need and availability of funds.

Selection of recipients and allocation of award: You must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen, enrolled at least half-time.

In the event that more students are eligible for FWS than there are funds available, preference is given to students who have a greater financial need and have completed applications on file while funding is available.

Award Schedule

The post-secondary institution arranges jobs on campus, or off campus with public or private non-profit agencies such as hospitals, libraries etc., for up to 35 hours per week. Factors considered by the financial aid officers in determining whether, and how many hours, you may work under this program are: financial need, class schedule, academic progress, and health status. Your earnings are determined by the rate of pay associated with your job, location, and the number of hours you work per week. The award ranges from $900-$2,500 per academic year.

Federal Loan Programs

The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program

One of the loan programs CUNY participates in is the Federal Direct Stafford Loan program where students borrow directly from the federal government. Just like any other loan, these loans are repaid with interest. The interest rate on direct loans is adjusted annually every July 1st.

Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans

Repayment begins six months after you are no longer enrolled for a minimum of six credits. Currently the subsidized and unsubsidized interest rates may be found online. Interest on the unsubsidized loan will begin to accrue upon disbursement of the loan. The federal government charges all borrowers an origination fee at the time the loan is disbursed which is deducted from the loan amount. Undergraduate freshmen may borrow up to $3,500, sophomores $4,500, and juniors and seniors, $5,500, per academic year up to a total aggregate of $23,000 in subsidized loan. The subsidized loan is a need based loan. Additional unsubsidized funds may be available for dependent students based upon income and the cost of education. The unsubsidized direct loan is available to eligible independent students, regardless of family income. Qualified freshmen may borrow an additional amount up to $9,500, sophomores $10,500, and juniors and beyond, $12,500 per academic year. The amount is based upon the cost of education.

Application Procedures

The application for Direct or PLUS loans may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office. The Entrance Interview is completed online. When the loan is approved, you will receive notification from CUNY. After signing the Master Promissory note the loan will be disbursed in accordance with the college payroll calendar.

To be eligible for a direct loan you must:

  • Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen.
  • Be enrolled at least half-time as a degree student in an approved college, university or other post-secondary institution in any of the United States.
  • Not be in default on a prior Federal student loan or owe a repayment on a PELL Grant or any Title IV Student Aid Program.
  • Have filed a FAFSA with the Department of Education and submitted all required documentation to Financial Aid. All students must undergo a financial needs analysis to determine eligibility.
  • Meet satisfactory progress requirements.

Additional Information about Direct Loans

  • Before receiving a federal loan you must complete an Entrance Interview, which will provide you with your Rights and Responsibilities as a borrower.
  • You must complete and sign your Master Promissory Note.
  • The funds are disbursed once per semester unless it is a one-semester only loan. In that case, the loan will be disbursed in two equal payments during the semester for which you have registered.
  • If you request a loan and later decide that you no longer need the funds, you may decline the loan by notifying the Financial Aid Office.
  • Immediately upon dropping below half-time status, you must complete an Exit Interview.
  • You are responsible for notifying the Direct Loan Servicer when you are no longer enrolled at least half-time and establishing a repayment plan.
  • You are responsible for beginning repayment on time or submitting any deferment arrangements.
  • Subsidized loan borrowers taking their first loan after July 1, 2013 may borrow a maximum of 150% of the length of their academic program. This means that students will be limited to receiving subsidized loans for 6 years in a 4 year program. The student may be eligible to borrow additional unsubsidized funds. In addition, borrowers who reach the 150% limitation will have their subsidy end for all outstanding subsidized loans.
  • You may view your loan information online by visiting www.nslds.ed.gov.

Federal PLUS Loan

Parents of dependent students may apply for a PLUS loan. The annual amount of a PLUS loan is limited to the student's cost of education minus any other estimated financial aid awarded. Unlike the Subsidized and Unsubsidized loan program, PLUS borrowers are subject to a credit check. In addition, repayment begins while you are still a student. The current interest rate may be found oneline, and is adjusted every July 1st. Applications are available in the Financial Aid Office. A completed FAFSA must be filed first. Once the loan is processed, a Promissory Note must be signed.

Federal PLUS Loan for Graduates

Graduate or professional students are eligible to borrow up to their cost of attendance less other financial aid. The terms and conditions applica to Parent PLUS Loans discussed above also apply to this loan. Applicants must complete a FAFSA and have applied for their annual maximum loan eligibility under the federal Subsidized and Unsubsidized programs. Students may then obtain a Graduate PLUS loan application in Financial Aid. The promissory note is signed online using the federal PIN. The interest rate may be found online, and the rate is adjusted every July 1st. Repayment begins 60 days after the loan has been fully disbursed. A Graduate PLUS borrower may receive an in-school deferment if enrolled at least halftime.

Federal Perkins Loan Program

Application for the Perkins Loan is made through the FAFSA. Once awarded, an Entrance Interview is required online which includes the signing of the annual Master Promissory Note.

Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards:

Loans are available to students enrolled at least half-time in approved post-secondary institutions eligible under law to participate in the Federal Perkins Loan Program. Students must be in good academic standing.

Award Schedule

Undergraduates may borrow up to $27,500 during their undergraduate career and up to $60,000 for graduate studies. The current interest rate may be found online.

Repayment

Repayment begins 9 months after dropping below half-time enrollment and may extend over a period of up to 10 years. Cancellation, deferment and forbearance information is available in the Financial Aid Office and on the Federal Perkins Loans webpage.

Withdrawals and Return of Federal Financial Aid

There are federal regulations pertaining to recipients of financial aid funds who withdraw from school. These regulations require the school, and sometimes the student, to repay some or all of the financial aid that was received. When these regulations require a larger repayment of federal funding sources than the amount specified by the school's refund policy, the student will be responsible for the difference. In general, the law assumes that you "earn" your federal financial aid awards directly in proportion to the number of days of the term you attend. If you completely withdraw from school during a term, the college must calculate, according to a specific formula, the portion of the total scheduled financial assistance you have earned and are therefore entitled to receive up to the time you withdrew.

If you receive, (or the college receives on your behalf), more assistance than you earn, the unearned excess funds must be returned to the Department of Education. If, on the other hand, you receive, (or the college receives on your behalf), less assistance than the amount you have earned, you may be able to receive those additional funds. The portion of your federal grants and loans you are entitled to receive is calculated on a percentage basis by comparing the total number of days in the semester to the number of days you completed before you withdrew. For example, if you complete 30% of the semester, you earn 30% of the assistance you were originally scheduled to receive. This means that 70% of your scheduled awards remain unearned and must be returned to the Federal Government. Once you have completed more than 60% of the semester, you can be said to have earned all (100%) of your assistance. If you withdraw from the college (either officially or unofficially) before completing 60% of the semester, you may have to repay any unearned federal monies that were already disbursed to you.

Your withdrawal date may be determined by the college as:

  • The date you submitted the withdrawal form to the Office of the Registrar.
  • Or the midpoint of the semester if you withdraw without notifying the college.

We will determine how much aid is to be repaid based on the documentation. You must repay the required amount during the term in which you withdraw. Students failing to repay the required amount will have a hold placed on their records, and will not be eligible for federal financial aid.

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