Standard Syllabus Format

Writing 301, 302, and 303 are general education courses offered in multiple sections taught by many instructors. At the end of these guidelines instructors will find a useful sample syllabus for Writing 303.

Standard Syllabus Format

Writing 301, 302, and 303 are general education courses offered in multiple sections taught by many instructors. Instructors need to include the following items on their syllabi to ensure consistency.

Note: See A Guide to Teaching Writing 300 for more detail on syllabi, course assignments, grading, and suggested research topics.

Course Description

Please choose the correct description for Writing 301, 302, or 303.

WRIT301 (Liberal Arts)Research and Writing for the Major 4 hrs. 3 cr. Research, reading, and writing for upper-divisioncourses; drafting, revising, editing, and formatting documents.Readings are drawn primarily from the humanities and social sciences. Assignments will encourage students to explore the research resources, patterns of discourse, and conventions of their own major disciplines. Preq: Junior status and completion of ENG 125.

WRIT302 (Liberal Arts) Research and Writing for the Sciences, Mathematics, and Technology 4 hrs. 3 cr. Research, reading,and writing for upper-division courses; drafting, revising,editing, and formatting documents. Readings are drawn primarilyfrom the areas of science and technology. Assignmentswill encourage students to explore the research resources, patternsof discourse, and conventions of their own major disciplines.Preq: Junior status and completion of ENG 125.

WRIT 303 (Liberal Arts) Research and Writing for Professional Programs 4 hrs. 3 cr.

Research, reading, and writing for upper-division courses; drafting, revising, editing, and formatting documents. Readings are drawn primarily from the areas of pertinent to professional concerns. Assignments will encourage students to explore the research resources, patterns of discourse, and conventions of their own major disciplines. Preq. Junior status and completion of ENG 125.

Course Section

Designate a specific section such as MN3, PQ2.

Time and Place of Course Meetings

Provide room numbers, days, and times courses meet.

Contact Information

Provide office location, phone number, email address, and office hours.

Required Texts

List book titles, and indicate where students can purchase, borrow, copy, and/or download. To emphasize the importance of modeling proper citation, please adhere to MLA or APA format when listing required texts on your syllabus.

Basis of Final Grade

Provide the breakdown of specific assignments by percentages.  That is: Paper #1: 15%, etc.

Requirements and Regulations

Include attendance, lateness, and conduct policies.

The Department of English has adopted a common attendance policy for multiple section courses (English 125, English 200, and Writing 300).  Your syllabus should include the following statement:

Success in this class depends on regular and punctual attendance. The English Department's policy for multiple section courses such as this one is:

Then include the applicable policy based on the number of days per week your class meets:

For classes that meet twice a week use this wording:

  • Students in classes that meet twice a week may miss no more than five (5) sessions.
  • Six (6) absences are grounds for failure.
  • Missing 15 minutes of class—arriving late, departing early, or leaving during class-- counts as half an absence.
  • Students in classes that meet once a week may miss no more than two (2) sessions.
  • Three (3) absences are grounds for failure.
  • Missing 15 minutes of class—arriving late, departing early, or leaving during class-- counts as half an absence.

For classes that meet once a week use this wording:

Plagiarism Statement

Provide definition of and policy regarding plagiarism: i.e. Deliberately submitting someone else's work as your own is a serious offense that will result in an F for the course. For more information about plagiarism, see The York College Bulletin, “Definitions and Examples of Academic Dishonesty” and Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab resource, “Avoiding Plagiarism.”

Learning Objectives (please list ALL of the objectives as they appear below)

Students will:

• Identify, define and develop a focused research topic

• Conduct library, academic database, and Internet research and evaluate sources

• Demonstrate the ability to summarize, paraphrase, and quote, as appropriate

• Synthesize material from multiple sources

• Document using MLA or APA format, both in-text and in a Works Cited or References list

• Demonstrate an ability to revise written work through drafting and staged assignments.

Course Outline of Assignments and Activities

Provide a detailed week-by-week outline of assignments and activities.

___________________________________________________________________

Printable Version

Sample Syllabus

Writing 303

Research and Writing for the Professional Programs

Dr. Heather Robinson

Fall 2012

Course Syllabus, Information and Schedule

What you’ll find in this document:

  • Bulletin description
  • Course texts
  • About your instructor
  • About Writing 303 – course objectives and expectations
  • Grading schema for the course
  • Communicating with me
  • Information about assignments – no late assignments and format for assignment files
  • Academic integrity statement
  • Course schedule

Bulletin Description: WRIT 303 (Liberal Arts) Research and Writing for Professional Programs 4 hrs. 3 cr.

Research, reading, and writing for upper-division courses; drafting, revising, editing, and formatting documents. Readings are drawn primarily from the areas of science and technology. Assignments will encourage students to explore the research resources, patterns of discourse, and conventions of their own major disciplines. Preq. Junior status and completion of ENG 125; AC 101. 2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory. Course sections may be offered as hybrid online courses or as fully asynchronous online courses.

Course text s:            

A grammar book such as Hacker, D., & Sommers, N. (2010). The Bedford handbook. (8th ed.). Boston: St. Martin's Press

 

You will also need:

  • A York College email account which is active.
  • Access to the course Blackboard page
  • Reliable and regular access to a computer at least the size of a netbook.
  • A quiet place to work at a computer.
  • Reliable internet access for several hours per week for the duration of this course.

 

  About Me

 My name is Heather Robinson, and I’m a full-time faculty member at York. That means that I’ll be around to talk to you, if you need in-person contact. Some useful information is below:

Name:                         Dr. Heather Robinson

Office:                        AC-2A16A

Phone:                        718.262.2479

Email:                        hrobinson@york.cuny.edu

Office Hours:            Tuesdays, 11:30 am -12:30 noon, unless otherwise announced. You are also free to make an appointment at any time.

 

The objectives of Writing 303 are:

Students will:

  • Identify, define and develop a focused research topic
  • Conduct library, academic database, and Internet research and evaluate sources
  • Demonstrate the ability to summarize, paraphrase, and quote, as appropriate
  • Synthesize material from multiple sources
  • Document using MLA or APA format, both in-text and in a Works Cited or References list
  • Demonstrate an ability to revise written work through drafting and staged assignments.

 

Grades in the course will be assigned as follows :

2 short papers

25%

Research proposal

5%

Annotated Bibliography

10%

Research Paper

40%

Attendance, Participation, Completion of low stakes work and drafts

10%

Final Exam

10%

           

Communication

One of the first things I’d like you to do, when you know you’re enrolled in this class, is to send me an email from your York College email address, to hrobinson@york.cuny.edu. This will get your email address in my address book, and mine – and it will help you to work out any glitches with your York College email address before the class started. After the course has started, please check this email address EVERY DAY. Blackboard sends emails to York College email addresses, so you will miss out on a lot if you don’t check this email address.

If you’re having problems with an assignment, with something that I have asked you to do, or, if you’re having personal issues – anything! – let me know as soon as you can. I will try my best to help you, but I can’t know if you are having trouble if you don’t tell me. In a face-to-face class, the dynamic that I see in the classroom helps me to figure out who needs help, but we don’t have that kind of indirect communication in this online class. The only way I know what’s going on is if you tell me, or if you disappear. The first option is a much better one!

Attendance Policy

 Success in this class depends on regular and punctual attendance. The English Department's policy for multiple section courses such as this one is:

  • Students in classes that meet twice a week may miss no more than five (5) sessions.
  • Six (6) absences are grounds for failure.
  • Missing 15 minutes of class—arriving late, departing early, or leaving during class-- counts as half an absence.

Information about Assignments

 No Late Assignments

Because of the amount of writing you will be doing in this course, I will not accept late assignments, except due to extenuating circumstances, which you must tell me about before the assignment is due. I do not give extensions when they are requested at a the time when, or after the assignment is due. I will accept course work via email ONLY when a student knows that s/he will be absent from a class. If you are in class, I expect your work to be handed in at the beginning of that class, printed appropriately, and stapled.

Format

All formal assignments sent via email must be submitted in a typed-document. I will accept documents in a .doc, .docx .rtf, .txt, or .odt format. Many PCs come with Microsoft Works installed. I cannot read .wps files.Use Microsoft Word, Open Office, NeoOffice, or Wordpad or Notepad if you don’t want to be bothered changing the file type (all word processors can save files as .rtf and .txt). Written assignments that are submitted via documents in the .wps format will be marked late, because it will take a little while for me to email you, and for you to resubmit the file in the right format. If you need help, let me know at least one day before the assignment is due, and I will help you.

Academic Integrity Statement

 

A violation of academic integrity is any instance when a student attempts to pass off someone else’s words or ideas as their own, no matter where s/he obtained those words or ideas, and no matter where these ideas are presented. We practice using quotation and citation in this course so you can benefit from others’ ideas, while attributing them appropriately. There is nothing wrong with representing someone else’s ideas in your work; you just have to give them credit. Additionally, there is nothing wrong with getting help on an assignment, but the final product must be predominantly the result of your own work. All academic integrity violations in English 303 will result in an F on the assignment, and/or, a failing grade in the course, and/or referral to the English Department’s Academic Integrity officer.

York College gives four definitions of types of academic integrity violation (these definitions can be found in the York College policy on academic integrity, which I have linked to below):

  • Cheating: Cheating is the unauthorized use or attempted use of material, information, notes, study aids, devices or communication during an academic exercise.
  • Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the act of presenting another person’s ideas, research or writings as your own.
  • Obtaining Unfair Advantage: Obtaining Unfair Advantage is any activity that intentionally or unintentionally gives a student an unfair advantage in his/her academic work over another student.
  • Falsification of Records and Official Documents

 

York College’s policies and procedures concerning academic integrity can be found here:

http://www.york.cuny.edu/president/legal-compliance/legal-affairs/cuny-legal-policies-procedures/Academic-Integrity-Policy.pdf/

 

Course Schedule (Subject to Change)

 

The activities given below are suggestions which give students practice with the sorts of skills that we want them to develop over the course of the semester. The pacing of the course is a suggestion; in particular, other instructors have the two short papers due much later in the course of the semester.

Week 1

Topic for Discussion:

Introductions; Introducing the Research Process

Read and discuss first common reading;

Writing summary of first reading

 Homework: 

First common reading (with reading questions)

Finishing the summary of Reading 1


Week 2

  Topic for Discussion:

 Summary writing and revision

Start to connect ideas in first two readings

Homework:  

Reading 2 (with reading questions)


Week 3

Topic for Discussion:

 Computer lab visit/Library visit

Finding, choosing and annotating research articles

Paper 1 due

Homework:    

Start thinking about a research paper topic; identify one possible source for research paper


Week 4

Topic for Discussion:

Abstracts; paraphrasing; citation

Homework:  

Reading 3


  Week 5

  Topic for Discussion:

 Analysis and argument

 Homework: 

First draft of research question/articulation of research topic


Week 6

Topic for Discussion:

 Refining a research question/research topic; Connecting the annotated bibliography with the research topic; Paper 2 due

Homework:  

Research question with partial annotated bibliography

 

Week 7

Topic for Discussion:

 The research proposal;Library session; Connecting course theme and individual research proposal

 Homework: 

Detailed research proposal draft due


Week 8

Topic for Discussion:

 The Research Paper – sections; citation; quotation, paraphrase, summary, analysis;Looking at successful research papers


Week 9

Topic for Discussion:

Refining the research topic: subtopics

Homework:  

Work on research paper draft


Week 10

Topic for Discussion:

Modelling synthesis, interpretation, connections, use of sources


Week 11

Topic for Discussion:

Research paper Draft #2 due

Homework:  

Research paper Draft #2


Week 12

Conferences


Week 13

Topic for Discussion:

Revising the research paper; incorporating source materials correctly and effectively


Week 14

Topic for Discussion:

 Proof-reading and editing; Final Draft of Research Paper due


Week 15      Final Exam



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