Five Myths about College Majors

Academic Advisement Center Five Myths about College Majors

“I haven’t chosen a major yet, so the grades I get now in general classes aren’t so important.”

Every grade you earn is figured into your Grade Point Average (GPA).  Some majors limit enrollment and require strong GPA's for admission.

“My major will guarantee me a certain job when I graduate.”

Watch out:  The job market can change quickly—professions in demand today may not be so desirable tomorrow. Unless you have a crystal ball, you don’t want to choose a major for which you have neither interest nor skill, and in which you may not do well, based on a guess of what's going to be "in" 3-4 years from now.

“The major I choose has to prepare me for a particular job.”

Statistics show that most people change careers more than once in their lifetimes. Liberal Arts degrees that train in a subject instead of a profession can provide flexibility for today’s changing workplace by providing solid foundations for a wide range of careers. 

Your college education alone qualifies you for many jobs. Employers will train you for their specific needs.

“If I choose the wrong major, my future could be in trouble!”

Most programs strengthen ‘transferable skills’ by teaching reasoning, critical thinking, problem-solving, research techniques, and sharpening communication skills in writing and speaking. For example, law schools require high GPA's and LSAT scores but don't specify majors.

At the end of the day -- choose a major you truly want to study. You will do better academically, and can fine-tune your focus in graduate school or gain experience on the job.

“If I don’t choose a major now, I won’t graduate on time!”

Decisions made too quickly often backfire.  Except in certain pre-professional programs with demanding curricula, studies show that students who start out undecided take no longer to graduate than students who begin with a major. 80% of all students change majors at least once!  

Choosing a major is a process, and worth taking the time to do properly.

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