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Threshold Concepts
Working from two articles written by Meyer and Land describing threshold concepts (TCs), participants will discuss the characteristics of TCs, work to identify possible TCs in our disciplines, and theorize about the pedagogical supports necessary for students to gain TC knowledge in different levels of courses in the disciplines.
Located in CETL Events
Thursdays at the Center: Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning
Discussion led by: Laura Fishman, History and Philosophy, and Deborah Majerovitz, Behavioral Sciences, and Margaret Ballantyne, Foreign Languages, ESL, and Humanities
Thursdays at the Center: The Impact of Faculty Research on Student Learning
Discussion led by: Ivelaw Griffith, Provost and Senior Vice President, and Tim Paglione, Earth and Physical Sciences
Tips for Better Assignments
Ten tips from the Library on how faculty can create better assignments for their students.
To Be or Not To Be: Responding to Disruptive and Distressed Students in Class
CETL panel facilitated by Jay Choi, Counseling Center, Tamara Bailey, Public Safety, & Paola Veras, Student Development
Trending Ideas: Strategies and Solutions for Implementing Twitter in the Classroom
Presentation by Andie Silva, English
Understanding and Engaging Millennial Students
CETL Speaker Forum: Richard Sweeney, University Librarian, NJ Institute of Technology
Located in CETL Events
Understanding the Politics and Context of Predatory Journals
Presentation by Monica Berger, Associate Professor & Electronic Resources Librarian, CUNY City Tech. Co-sponsored by the York College Library & the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL).
Using Case Studies to Teach Science
A CETL Workshop presented by Margaret MacNeil, Biology
Located in CETL Events
Using Personal Narrative Writing as Pedagogy in All Disciplines
Do personal narratives encourage productive intellectual experiences for writers/readers, or do they serve little purpose beyond intellectual "navel-gazing"? This workshop intends to reconsider the ways in which personal experience is both epistemic and a base for students' academic inquiry. Facilitated by Professors Shereen Inayatulla, English, Tanya Prewitt, Health and Physical Education, and Debbie Rowe, English. Sponsored by The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.
Located in CETL Events